Thursday, May 5, 2011

Water, Water, Everywhere

Sunday, I drove across the Ohio River bridge to the small town where I grew up.  I knew the flooding had gotten pretty bad there, but I was still shocked to see it for myself.  I grew up listening to my grandparents talking about the 1937 flood and the damage it caused to so many people in that town.  I never dreamed flooding would get that bad again, certainly not in my lifetime. 

There was a steady rain while I was there, and as I drove up and down the streets, I found plenty of people scrambling to sandbag and save their homes.  It was becoming obvious that the predicted crest for the Ohio River was going to get bumped up, and as the rain got heavier and harder, there was a real desperation among the people lining up for sandbags.  The line was fifteen trailers deep at all times while I was there.

As soon as someone would fill their trailer they were dash off to desposit them and head back for another load.


I could see that some folks were losing the battle, and they probably knew it, but they had to do all they could save their property.  It just broke my heart to sit in a parked vehicle on the main street in town and watch the mad dash of sandbaggers, sand trucks and moving trucks.



Photo courtesy:  Beau Dodson

The water would go up considerably within 24 hours after I left.   I drove through a dry parking lot at this car dealership Sunday to take a picture of the water splashing against the back edge of the property. 



This area succumbed to the water the next day as well.


Photo courtesy:  Beau Dodson

This is the state park that normally greets visitors at the edge of the city.  It is completely under water.

Photo courtesy:  Beau Dodson

Can you imagine how bad the mosquitos are going to be there this year?  The area right across the street is now under water, too.



Photos courtesy:  Beau Dodson

The casino that normally sits at the river's edge in town is closed and will probably be closed for a while for cleanup when this is all over.  Think of all those jobs lost because people can't wait that long to go back to work.


Photo courtesy:  George Cumbee



All up and down the streets closest to the river were roads and homes in and under water.






There are parts of town that I never dreamed would come close to flooding.  It's definitely one for the record books, but it's not a record anyone wanted to earn.

7 comments:

oreneta said...

Good lord Hula, this is horrific. Astonishing and horrific.

J.G. said...

I can't even imagine this, even though your photos make it quite real. Sandbagging in the rain seems like the height of desperation. There must be a lot of people too tired and worried to sleep tonight.

Rink's Ramblings said...

This is such a tragedy. I remember when I arrived in 93 how high the Mississippi was but could never imagine the Ohio doing what it's doing now. It's such a wonderful community and it breaks my heart.

Rink's Ramblings said...

This is such a tragedy. I remember when I arrived in 93 how high the Mississippi was but could never imagine the Ohio doing what it's doing now. It's such a wonderful community and it breaks my heart.

Jan n Jer said...

My heart goes out to all those poor folks. To see all the flooding is very humbling. We have been so lucky in our neck of the woods1

Louisiana Belle said...

I feel very sad for the people being ravaged by the flood waters. And to think how much we could have used some of that rain to put out the fires in Texas. :/ Our planet is completely out of whack.

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